Whuskie — Things in Scots #15

Hi all 😁 and welcome to December’s project: Things in Scots. This month I am collaborating with my wife, Susan (☜ follow this link to see and hear her post), and we’ll be posting mostly daily — Things in Scots (great title eh? πŸ˜‚).

Today’s is quite an easy one; whuskie – whisky. Whisky has many different names in Scots: fuskie (north-east) bree, barley-bree, John Barleycorn, the hard (stuff), the stuffie, the craitur, the mercies, wheich, usquebae, aquavita, mountain dew; cheap, inferior whisky is referred to as speel-the-wa; cheap, strong and raw as kill-the-cairter.

Whuskie by Jez Braithwaite
Whuskie

A measure of whuskie is known as a dram, or a hauf; a small measure is a wee hauf (not spoken of in this hoose πŸ˜‚ ).

And below is a dram, hooker, cauker, roostie nail or wee goldie (glass of whisky). The very fine example within the glass this time is The Ardmore Legacy 😁

Slainte!

Wee goldie by Jez Braithwaite
Wee goldie

All the Scots words for these posts are taken from The Concise English-Scots Dictionary, by the Scottish National Dictionary Association. The words chosen will be the generally accepted term, but as in all languages there are regional variations, as well as sub-species variations. For example, an owl is generally known as a hoolet in Scots, but an ool in Shetland & the NE. A barn owl is a white hoolet & a long eared owl, a hornnie hoolet.

As we do these posts, we’re learning as well; so we apologise in advance for any mistakes ☺️

If any of you out there have a burning desire to know the Scots word for anything πŸ€”, please let us know!

Hae a guid day 😁

Eeshogel — Things in Scots #14 and A Photo a Week Challenge: Ice, Ice Baby

Hi all 😁 and welcome to December’s project: Things in Scots. This month I am collaborating with my wife, Susan (☜ follow this link to see and hear her post), and we’ll be posting mostly daily — Things in Scots (great title eh? πŸ˜‚).

A 2fer today; Eeshogel (icicle) is today’s Things in Scots as well as my entry for Nancy Merrill’s Challenge: Ice, Ice Baby. Other words for icicle are ice-tangle, shockle, and bobantilter in Caithness.

All the Scots words for these posts are taken from The Concise English-Scots Dictionary, by the Scottish National Dictionary Association. The words chosen will be the generally accepted term, but as in all languages there are regional variations, as well as sub-species variations. For example, an owl is generally known as a hoolet in Scots, but an ool in Shetland & the NE. A barn owl is a white hoolet & a long eared owl, a hornnie hoolet.

As we do these posts, we’re learning as well; so we apologise in advance for any mistakes ☺️

If any of you out there have a burning desire to know the Scots word for anything πŸ€”, please let us know!

Hae a guid day 😁

Bink — Things in Scots #13

Hi all 😁 and welcome to December’s project: Things in Scots. This month I am collaborating with my wife, Susan (☜ follow this link to see and hear her post), and we’ll be posting mostly daily — Things in Scots (great title eh? πŸ˜‚).

Bink (bench) is today’s Things in Scots. Also known as a binch, furm or firm. A bench made of turf is a sunk, a smalll bench is a sunkie and a long wooden bench with a chest below is a lang-settle.

All the Scots words for these posts are taken from The Concise English-Scots Dictionary, by the Scottish National Dictionary Association. The words chosen will be the generally accepted term, but as in all languages there are regional variations, as well as sub-species variations. For example, an owl is generally known as a hoolet in Scots, but an ool in Shetland & the NE. A barn owl is a white hoolet & a long eared owl, a hornnie hoolet.

As we do these posts, we’re learning as well; so we apologise in advance for any mistakes 😊

If any of you out there have a burning desire to know the Scots word for anything πŸ€”, please let us know!

Hae a guid day 😁

Brammle — Things in Scots #12

Hi all 😁 and welcome to December’s project: Things in Scots. This month I am collaborating with my wife, Susan (☜ follow this link to see and hear her post), and we’ll be posting mostly daily — Things in Scots (great title eh? πŸ˜‚).

Brammle (blackberry) is today’s Things in Scots. Other names for these tasty berries are: brambles and ladies’ gartens!

Brammle Flooers

Brammle flowers
Brammle flooers

Brammles

Brammles

All the Scots words for these posts are taken from The Concise English-Scots Dictionary, by the Scottish National Dictionary Association. The words chosen will be the generally accepted term, but as in all languages there are regional variations, as well as sub-species variations. For example, an owl is generally known as a hoolet in Scots, but an ool in Shetland & the NE. A barn owl is a white hoolet & a long eared owl, a hornnie hoolet.

As we do these posts, we’re learning as well; so we apologise in advance for any mistakes ☺️

If any of you out there have a burning desire to know the Scots word for anything πŸ€”, please let us know!

Hae a guid day 😁

Gowan — Things in Scots #11

Hi all 😁 and welcome to December’s project: Things in Scots. This month I am collaborating with my wife, Susan (☜ follow this link to see her post), and we’ll be posting daily — Things in Scots (great title eh? πŸ˜‚).

Gowan (daisy) is today’s Things in Scots. Gowan is the overall general name for daisy’s but there are different names for sub-species.

Continue reading “Gowan — Things in Scots #11”

Dainty-lion — Things in Scots #10

Hi all 😁 and welcome to December’s project: Things in Scots. This month I am collaborating with my wife, Susan (☜ follow this link to see her post), and we’ll be posting daily — Things in Scots (great title eh? πŸ˜‚).

The dainty-lion (great name 😁(dandelion)) is today’s Things in Scots. These bright, colourful, wee flooers are also known as: pee-the-bed, pish-the-bed, horse gowan, and what o’clock is it?

All the Scots words for these posts are taken from The Concise English-Scots Dictionary, by the Scottish National Dictionary Association. The words chosen will be the generally accepted term, but as in all languages there are regional variations, as well as sub-species variations. For example, an owl is generally known as a hoolet in Scots, but an ool in Shetland & the NE. A barn owl is a white hoolet & a long eared owl, a hornnie hoolet.

As we do these posts, we’re learning as well; so we apologise in advance for any mistakes ☺️

If any of you out there have a burning desire to know the Scots word for anything πŸ€”, please let us know!

Hae a guid day 😁

Buckie-breer — Things in Scots #9

Hi all 😁 and welcome to December’s project: Things in Scots. This month I am collaborating with my wife, Susan (☜ follow this link to see her post), and we’ll be posting daily — Things in Scots (great title eh? πŸ˜‚).

Buckie-breer (wild rose bush) is today’s Things in Scots. Sorry Bushboy, (☜ make sure and check out his site!!!) it’s not a cold bucket of breer 🀣

All the Scots words for these posts are taken from The Concise English-Scots Dictionary, by the Scottish National Dictionary Association. The words chosen will be the generally accepted term, but as in all languages there are regional variations, as well as sub-species variations. For example, an owl is generally known as a hoolet in Scots, but an ool in Shetland & the NE. A barn owl is a white hoolet & a long eared owl, a hornnie hoolet.

As we do these posts, we’re learning as well; so we apologise in advance for any mistakes ☺️

If any of you out there have a burning desire to know the Scots word for anything πŸ€”, please let us know!

Hae a guid day 😁

Breer — Things in Scots #8

Hi all 😁 and welcome to December’s project: Things in Scots. This month I am collaborating with my wife, Susan (☜ follow this link to see her post), and we’ll be posting daily — Things in Scots (great title eh? πŸ˜‚).

We’ve all seen these growing about the place — breer (wild rose).

Continue reading “Breer — Things in Scots #8”

Dog-hip — Things in Scots #7

Hi all 😁 and welcome to December’s project: Things in Scots. This month I am collaborating with my wife, Susan (☜ follow this link to see her post), and we’ll be posting daily — Things in Scots (great title eh? πŸ˜‚).

Most people are probably pretty familiar with the dog-hip (rosehip) from their childhood, either as missiles or as nature’s itching powder πŸ˜‚ They are also known as doggies’ hip, hap, buckie and choop; the plural is hippans.

All the Scots words for these posts are taken from The Concise English-Scots Dictionary, by the Scottish National Dictionary Association. The words chosen will be the generally accepted term, but as in all languages there are regional variations, as well as sub-species variations. For example, an owl is generally known as a hoolet in Scots, but an ool in Shetland & the NE. A barn owl is a white hoolet & a long eared owl, a hornnie hoolet.

As we do these posts, we’re learning as well; so we apologise in advance for any mistakes ☺️

If any of you out there have a burning desire to know the Scots word for anything πŸ€”, please let us know!

Hae a guid day 😁

Rimie Jennie Nettle — Things in Scots #6 and Flower of the Day Dec 06

Hi all 😁 and welcome to December’s project: Things in Scots. This month I am collaborating with my wife, Susan (☜ follow this link to see her post), and we’ll be posting daily — Things in Scots (great title eh? πŸ˜‚).

Todays post is a 2fer, linking up with ☞ Cee’s Flower of the Day and keeping my series of frosty posts going.

Rimie jennie nettle (frosty stinging nettle); also known as a jaggie nettle or jobbie nettle.

Rimie jaggie nettles
Rimie jaggie nettles
Rimie jaggie nettles in noir by Jez Braithwaite
Rimie jaggie nettles in noir

All the Scots words for these posts are taken from The Concise English-Scots Dictionary, by the Scottish National Dictionary Association. The words chosen will be the generally accepted term, but as in all languages there are regional variations, as well as sub-species variations. For example, an owl is generally known as a hoolet in Scots, but an ool in Shetland & the NE. A barn owl is a white hoolet & a long eared owl, a hornnie hoolet.

As we do these posts, we’re learning as well; so we apologise in advance for any mistakes ☺️

If any of you out there have a burning desire to know the Scots word for anything πŸ€”, please let us know!

Hae a guid day 😁